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East Meets West.

East Meets West.



East Meets West


Getting to know "The Godfather of Brat Style," Go Takamine.

 


 WORDS Iron & Air Media  IMAGES Jeff Stockwell for Iron & Air Media



In the late '90s, Go Takamine was creating something that would provide the strong right hook that custom motorcycle culture needed. While most people associate the term 'brat style' with small displacement, flat seated, low-slung motorcycles, that emulate old school bobbers yet maintain rideability (not forgoing rear suspension, for instance), it all actually started with Go.  

In 2014, Go made the transition from Japan to California, planting Brat Style roots in Long Beach.

The term is derived from Go Takamine's Tokyo, Japan shop of the same name – Brat Style. Go was producing these customs as early as 1998, more than a decade before it became part of the common vernacular in custom motorcycle tribes. In 2014, Go made the transition from Japan to California, planting Brat Style roots in Long Beach. He's been continuing to blend traditional Japanese craftsmanship and motorcycling to produce customs that cement him as one of the best builders in our industry, sought by the likes of BMW and Yamaha to build customs from their latest platforms.



This past week, we spent a day with the godfather of Bratstyle himself to give the motorcycle-inspired Converse x Neighborhood Chuck Taylor All-Star ’70 collab a thorough test run. 

Go is also quite an accomplished rider and racer, competing in various events throughout California, including Hell on Wheels and the Race of Gentlemen. We had to see his Indian 'Chout' in action. It consists of a 1941 Chief motor, modified to fit into the smaller and lighter 1927 Sport Scout frame.

Thanks to Converse for partnering to produce this content.